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EU-Strategie zur Cybersicherheit: Desiderat Cyberdiplomatie

EU-Strategie zur Cybersicherheit: Desiderat Cyberdiplomatie

In the latest issue of SWP-Aktuell, PD Dr. Matthias C. Kettemann and Annegret Bendiek explain why the new EU cybersecurity strategy is too one-sided. The focus should not only be on deterrence and defence, but also on trust and security. They advocate for promoting cyber diplomacy in the European Union.
 
Read the complete article here (PDF, in German)

Abstract

In December 2020, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new cybersecurity strategy with the objective of strengthening Europe's technological and digital sovereignty. The document lists reform plans to link cybersecurity more closely with new EU rules on data, algorithms, markets, and Internet services. However, it clearly falls short of building a European cyber diplomacy that is committed to both "strategic openness" and protecting the digital single market. To achieve this, EU cyber diplomacy should be more coherent in its supranational, democratic and economic/technological dimensions. Germany can make an important contribution to this by providing the European External Action Service (EEAS) with the necessary legal, technical and financial resources.
 
Bendiek, A.; Kettemann, M. C. (2021): EU-Strategie zur Cybersicherheit: Desiderat Cyberdiplomatie [EU Cybersecurity Strategy: Desideratum Cyber Diplomacy]. In: SWP-Aktuell 2021/A 12, February 2021, https://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/aktuell/2021A12_EUCyberdiplomatie.pdf

EU-Strategie zur Cybersicherheit: Desiderat Cyberdiplomatie

In the latest issue of SWP-Aktuell, PD Dr. Matthias C. Kettemann and Annegret Bendiek explain why the new EU cybersecurity strategy is too one-sided. The focus should not only be on deterrence and defence, but also on trust and security. They advocate for promoting cyber diplomacy in the European Union.
 
Read the complete article here (PDF, in German)

Abstract

In December 2020, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new cybersecurity strategy with the objective of strengthening Europe's technological and digital sovereignty. The document lists reform plans to link cybersecurity more closely with new EU rules on data, algorithms, markets, and Internet services. However, it clearly falls short of building a European cyber diplomacy that is committed to both "strategic openness" and protecting the digital single market. To achieve this, EU cyber diplomacy should be more coherent in its supranational, democratic and economic/technological dimensions. Germany can make an important contribution to this by providing the European External Action Service (EEAS) with the necessary legal, technical and financial resources.
 
Bendiek, A.; Kettemann, M. C. (2021): EU-Strategie zur Cybersicherheit: Desiderat Cyberdiplomatie [EU Cybersecurity Strategy: Desideratum Cyber Diplomacy]. In: SWP-Aktuell 2021/A 12, February 2021, https://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/aktuell/2021A12_EUCyberdiplomatie.pdf

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Year of publication

2021

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